March 11, 2009

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Wedding Days Our oldest got married last year. We celebrated with some wonderful family traditions. They got married in the morning at the Mount Timpanogos LDS Temple on a bitter cold January day. They were married by her grandpa, who is a sealer at the temple, which was a real treat. Then we had a family luncheon, and later in the day, a beautiful reception with a wedding cake... ...and dancing with her daddy. We had great photography, and friends and cousins made beautiful music to entertain us. We sent them off with confetti - and their friends of course decorated their car. It was a completely lovely and wonderful day! Doesn't she make a beautiful bride?! But wedding traditions weren't always the same in our family. On another cold January day - this one in 1889 - Virie Mendenhall and Nephi Perkins took a bobsleigh - and two of their school friends to act as witnesses - and rode up Dayton Canyon in Idaho. They arrived at the home of the Justice of the Peace and were married. Just like that. At the Mendenhall ranch, everybody was waiting for them. There they had a wedding dinner, and rolled back the rugs for dancing. Several guests gave recitations and Nephi and his cousin, Dave Evans, sang duets. (I wish I knew what songs they sang!) So far, it seems a lot the same, doesn't it? This is where the traditions get really different... It was a custom at the time to "put the bride and groom to bed." Friends would put the bride in the groom's nightshirt and the groom in her nightgown - usually over their regular clothing. Then they were tucked into bed together. (I'm sure it was way more fun for the friends than for the bride and groom...) During the evening, Virie knew what was coming. She quietly tucked a key in the top of her high-buttoned shoe. When the festivities came to an end, it was time for the great joke. But the couple was missing. No one had seen them slip away. Soon everyone was laughing and calling through the locked door of the little upstairs bedroom. Someone asked George, her father, for the extra key - but all the keys were gone. There was not going to be any "putting to bed" on this night! Celia, Nephi's older sister, pounded on the door with both hands and shouted, "You just wait until the next time you two get married!" What are your family wedding traditions - and how do they compare to the traditions of your ancestors? I hope you'll leave me a comment and tell me about it! Post Script: I'm so excited and honored that Uphill Both Ways is featured this week on Genea-Musing's "Best of the Genea-Bloggers" list! Every week, Randy Seaver selects from hundreds of blog articles written by genealogy bloggers, and posts his "Best Of" list on the blog "Genea-Musings." THANKS SO MUCH Randy for including me in your list...
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The Pig Killers Child Discipline. How many times have you heard someone say, "What are you supposed to do? Children don't come with a manual!" Nowadays, they don't have to. It seems like there's a parenting expert on every corner. There are all sorts of parenting styles - like "helicopter" and "drill sergeant" parenting. (The only ones I can think of are the ones you're not supposed to do...) There are different classes and methods you can follow - "Parenting with Love and Logic," "Teaching Children Joy," and "The Total Transformation." (Yup, I've tried them all...) And there are always new parenting techniques - spanking is out, time-out is in. A century ago, none of these experts were available - but even then, people still came up with parenting ideas. (Remember "children should be seen and not heard"?) I suppose child discipline has been discussed in every play group, at every quilting bee, and around every cook pot since time began. But it all boils down to this - what works well for one child, doesn't work for the next - and we all have to figure it out for ourselves. Henry and Naomi Heninger faced parenting challenges just like we all do...here's what they did. Henry and Naomi raised their family of ten children in the late 1800's and early 1900's. Shortly after their 6th child was born in 1897, Henry was called to serve an LDS mission, leaving Naomi to take care of the farm and family. Their oldest son, Lorin, was only nine years old - but still expected to do his share around the farm. Naomi's younger brothers lived nearby, and they would also come to help. One day the "helpers" were doing their farm chores, and got to playing. They started chasing the pig - and chased it until it fell down dead. What was Naomi to do? How do you discipline (punish) children for killing a pig? She did the only thing she could do. She cut out large letters spelling "Pig Killers" and pasted them on the their foreheads. Why have I never thought of that? After Henry came home from his mission, he stepped in to help with parenting. Henry was well-known for his lengthy prayers. One night during the family prayer, some of the boys started getting bored and unruly, giggling and poking each other. Henry stopped praying and walked over to the kindling pile. He came back, swatted each boy's behind with a piece of kindling - then knelt down and continued his prayer right where he left off. _______________________________________ One traditional parenting method was to sit the child in the corner in the pouting chair. This is Miles pouting in my pouting chair. My Pouting Chair My Mommy's kind-of short you see, She bought this chair for her, not me. It helps her reach the things up high, Without it she wouldn't even try. It looks like a chair as you can see, Now she uses it for me. When I'm bad...

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